Thursday, July 18, 2019

Tourism Thursdays

Tourism Thursdays



What's happening around us.


Annual Lions Club Sportsfest and Swim Meet
Saturday & Sunday July 20 & 21, 2019
In the Sons of Scotland Park, (pool) Dutton
Our LIONS Food Booth & Bar will be open at noon, with breakfast on a bun, each morning!
Date: 
Saturday, July 20, 2019 - 09:00 to 17:00

Paranormal Investigation July 19 & 20 with CPI
 Investigate both the museum and the barn and see if we have spirits from the other side.  With the gang from Capture Paranormal Investigations, tickets are $25/person including light refreshments.  Only 15 tickets available each night.  Just order online using PayPal or Credit Card. 
Date: 
Friday , July 19th 21:00 - 00:00Saturday, July 20, 21:00 to 00:00
Location: 
Backus Page House
29424 Lakeview Line
Wallacetown, ON N0L 2M0



CANADIAN CONNECTIONS TO THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR
The war between the US states is at its peak. Step back to the 1860s with Union and Confederate military reenactments, vendors, food, exhibits, and hands on activities.
Date: 
Saturday, July 27, 2019 - 10:00 to Sunday, July 28, 2019 - 16:00
Location: 
Backus Page House
29424 Lakeview Line
Wallacetown, ON N0L 2M0

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Toolsday-Hay Knives

Hello readers! I’m Carlie, and I’m the Agricultural Exhibit Designer at the Backus-Page House Museum. Throughout the summer, I'll be sorting through various tools in the barn to get ready for the exhibit! Every Tuesday I’ll be sharing some of what I learned on our blog!

Hay you! Today we'll be talking about a tool that was essential to the lives of the settlers, the hay knife! 



As I'm sure you can imagine, hay was essential to the lives of the settlers. As farms got larger (and growth of the farm was definitely one of the goals of the settlers), the quantity of hay needed to sustain the livestock increased. Due to spacing issues, farmers often had to keep hay outside in haystacks. Next, the stack would need to be put into a dome shape with a top to prevent the elements from damaging it.  

This was an important task, because a farmer had to assure that there was enough hay to feed all of the livestock throughout the winter. If there wasn't enough, then the farmer would be in a very bad place.

The most well known hay harvesting tool is the scythe, which was most likely created by the Romans. The hay knife, although less well known, was a useful tool for our settlers. It would have been used to cut hay.



If you want to learn more about the tools here at the Backus-Page Museum, or want to come see our collection with your own eyes, then come to out our Civil War Reenactment on July 27th and 28th.  See you then!

Monday, July 15, 2019

Meet A Board Member Diana Arthur

Where are you from?
       "Aylmer Ontario ."

How long have you been a member ?
       "1 year"

Why do you love the Museum?
        "I love history and I want to preserve the information of the early settlers from the area . "

Do you have a favourite room or artifact?
       "I love the parlour and the picture of young Queen Victoria!"

Why do you volunteer?/ Why should people volunteer here?
       "To help a good cause and to make new friendships. "

1 Fun fact about you!?
      "I like equestrian activities and enjoy the history of dressage."

Favourite memory or memories from the Museum? 
       "The paranormal night I attended, it was exciting and frightening, we all had so many laughs!  "


Thank you for reading, tune in next Monday!
Sabrina Merks

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Tourism Thursdays

Tourism Thursdays



What's happening around us.


JUMBO AT BLYTH FESTIVAL THEATRE

Check out Jumbo at the Blyth Festival Theatre on Saturday, July 13th at 2 pm! Sponsored by the Sparta & District Historical Society.
Cost: $90.00 per person
Phone: 519-762-2990

Date: 
Saturday, July 13, 2019 - 14:00
Location: 
Blyth Festival Theatre

Wallacetown & St. Thomas, ON







We will have a display on Saturday of the event in the train station! Featuring information about the Highland games and early Scottish Settlers who arrived in 1819! 















CANADIAN CONNECTIONS TO THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR

The war between the US states is at its peak. Step back to the 1860s with Union and Confederate military reenactments, vendors, food, exhibits, and hands on activities.

Date: 
Saturday, July 27, 2019 - 10:00 to Sunday, July 28, 2019 - 16:00
Location: 
Backus Page House
29424 Lakeview Line

Wallacetown, ON N0L 2M0

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

Toolsday-The Honey House

Hello readers! I’m Carlie, and I’m the Agricultural Exhibit Designer at the Backus-Page House Museum. Throughout the summer, I'll be sorting through various tools in the barn to get ready for the exhibit! Every Tuesday I’ll be sharing some of what I learned on our blog!

This week it was way too hot to be going through the barn, so I decided to talk about a 'tool' that doubles as one of my favourite buildings on the property-the Honey House! 

The honey house was originally built between 1828-1831 on William Pearce Farm, where it stayed until 1967 when it was willed to the Elgin County Pioneer Museum. A year later, it moved again to a new home in St Thomas. On April 1st, 1978, tragedy struck. A group of vandals burnt the Honey House to the ground! However, years later, a group of students from Parkside Collegiate Institute in St Thomas built an exact replica of the Honey House. We want to give a huge thank you to the teacher who led the project, Mr Thomas and Mr Hatherall!

It wasn't until December 2006 that the Honey House moved to it's current location at the Backus-Page House from the former Pioneer Museum.

Now that I've explained the history of the house, it might be worth mentioning how this would have been used as a tool. 

A descendant of the original owners of the house, Rebecca (Pearce) Waite (1909-1994) explained that Honey House would have been used to attract bees in the hope that they would make their honey inside the house. This would be a huge convenience, so settlers wouldn't have to look for hives. In the settler times, people would have put containers of honey around the house. If they were lucky, wild bees would come to the house, crawling through the holes in the side. Then, they would create honey inside the boxes stored within, which would later be collected. 

This wasn't exactly a safe procedure. In fact, children were often warned to stay away from the Honey House to lessen the chance of being stung. This was especially important because there wasn't the same information about allergies back then as we have today.

So there it is, a brief history of the Honey House! If you're interested in seeing it for yourself, then come to out our Civil War Reenactment on July 27th and 28th.  See you then!










Monday, July 8, 2019

Meet a Board Member Catie Welch

Where are you from?
       "Dutton but now London."

How long have you worked here?
       "5 years"

Why do you love the Museum?
        "I love history and this hidden gem has brought me through many good and bad times. It is my piece of heaven out here! It is a beautiful piece of land; quiet, serene and full of wonderful life. "

Do you have a favourite room or artifact?
       "The front door and door bell!"

Why do you volunteer?/ Why should people volunteer here?
       "Again, it's my piece of heaven so I love to come out and work in the gardens and I love events because I love having re-enactors on site and all the excitement they bring. The group out here is also "My Museum Family" working out here and being with them fills my soul."

1 Fun fact about you!?
      "I'm a teacher."

Favourite memory or memories from the Museum? 
       "Working with Sabrina and Delany to fill and then later, empty to store, 100 burlap sand bags for the Living History weekend for the WW1 trench. They were hard work and an adventure, but we had many laughs and ice cream to top it off! "


Thank you for reading, tune in next Monday!
Sabrina Merks